When you applied to work for the company you are with now, you probably didn’t accept the position with the purpose of getting into an accident in mind. Unfortunately, America’s workers are placed in dangerous positions on a daily basis. Even jobs that you wouldn’t think of as dangerous can end up injuring workers.

We know that there are some jobs that are safer than others, but there isn’t any job that is completely injury proof. Factory workers might suffer harm if a component strikes them or is defective. Office workers might suffer back injuries from sitting all day. Cashiers might have carpal tunnel syndrome.

In each of these cases, the worker is likely going to need medical care. Even if there isn’t a need for long-term care, having the injury checked out is necessary. Now, here is where you have to think carefully. Are you, the worker, responsible for the costs associated with the injury? In just about every case, the answer to this is that you aren’t responsible for those costs.

One way that you have to avoid financial ruin because of the workplace injury is to file for workers’ compensation coverage. This coverage can help you get the medical care you need. If you have to remain off of work for a while, it can provide you with wage replacement benefits.

Some employers might balk at you wanting to file for these benefits. Even if it means that the employer might have an increase in workers’ compensation costs, you need to make sure that you file your claim in accordance with the law to protect your own rights.