The workers’ compensation program helps workers who need to get medical care or who are unable to work due to a work-related injury. There are often questions that come up about what types of injuries are compensable. There isn’t a lot of room for doubt when you are trying to answer this question.

The one factor that is common to all workers’ compensation claims is that they are due to an injury that occurred while a person was in furtherance of his or her employer’s business. This isn’t limited only to work that is done at the office or workplace location. Instead, it covers a host of scenarios, but they all revolve around being related to work.

People tend to get confused when they start thinking about injuries that occur outside of a major accident that occurred in the normal work space. When an injury happens on the job, it is pretty easy to figure out when the injury is compensable.

If you are injured at a work function, such as a dinner with clients or a company event, you are likely eligible for compensation. Injuries that occur as the result of cumulative trauma caused by performing job duties can also qualify. People who are injured in an car crash that occurs while they are on the clock for a special mission, such as going to make the company’s deposit at the bank or driving from one patient’s home to the next, would likely be able to get benefits.

The so-called “coming and going rule” will prevent the compensability of an injury suffered on the way from home to work or from work to home, but these issues are fact-specific and must be analyzed carefully. Another exception might be if the person was intoxicated when the accident occurred and the intoxication caused the injury. If you think that you might be eligible for benefits, you should contact our office right away to discuss the specific facts of your claim.  Our certified specialist workers’ compensation lawyers can analyze your particular circumstances and provide you with expert advice.

Source: FindLaw, “What Types of Injuries are Compensable Under Workers’ Compensation?,” accessed June 08, 2018